Parental love in digging by seamus heaney and those winter sundays by robert hayden

The alliteration here could have been used to draw attention onto what he and his mother were doing. Seamus Heaney is a local poet, born in on a small farm in County Derry. Both poems however make me realise that the time I have with my parents is special and when I can, I should make the most of it.

The end of line five gives us another insight into how he felt about this chore; he was sharing the memories with his mother. I look down Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds Bends low, comes up twenty years away Stooping in rhythm through potato drills Where he was digging.

Just like his old man. I also prefer the poem by Heaney simply for the story it tells. I look down Till his straining rump among the flowerbeds Bends low, comes up twenty years away Stooping in rhythm through potato drills Where he was digging.

Digging - Poem by Seamus Heaney

I found this poem quite moving in a sense it is a grown man writing down the memory in which he was the most intimate with his mother, the parent many of us are the most closest to. He rooted out tall tops, buried the bright edge deep To scatter new potatoes that we picked, Loving their cool hardness in our hands.

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft Against the inside knee was levered firmly. Under my window, a clean rasping sound When the spade sinks into gravelly ground: I have never read any poem by either of these two poets, even though Seamus Heaney is quite a well known local poet.

Seamus Heaney’s When all the Others and Robert Hayden’s Those Winter Sundays Essay

The fact he mentions the Priest could possibly be a link to the octave and the fact he and his mother only had that time together because the rest of his family was at Mass listening to a priest. Just like his old man. Between my finger and my thumb The squat pen rests.

Those Winter Sundays

The coarse boot nestled on the lug, the shaft Against the inside knee was levered firmly. The last two lines of the stanza have yet another surprise ending but may explain the ending of the first stanza.

Alliteration is used here to make the task his father done stand out. Although I found both poems moving for the different messages each one contained. He straightened up To drink it, then fell to right away Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods Over his shoulder, going down and down For the good turf.

So it could possibly be he never thanked his father and spoke indifferently to him as he was scared of being shouted at or worse. He finished school in and got into Detroit City College through a scholarship. In the sestet the poem leaps forward many years to the bedside of his dying mother.

The octave and sestet are connected closely as in the octave we learn of a memory he had where he felt close to his mother and in the sestet we learn that had been the closest to his mother he had been and I believe that by writing of her death, he is telling us how special he finds that memory, even though it is so simple it can be written in eight lines.

Copyright by Seamus Heaney. He enrolled for an English Literature masters in and graduated in By God, the old man could handle a spade. The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge Through living roots awaken in my head.

The cold smell of potato mould, the squelch and slap Of soggy peat, the curt cuts of an edge Through living roots awaken in my head. He straightened up To drink it, then fell to right away Nicking and slicing neatly, heaving sods Over his shoulder, going down and down For the good turf.

Under my window, a clean rasping sound When the spade sinks into gravelly ground: The eleventh to thirteenth lines tell us that he neither responded to the priest nor cried instead he recalled the memory he wrote about in the octave.Comparing of the poems: essaysIn comparing Seamus Heaney's "Digging" and Robert Hayden's "Those Winter Sundays", both works represent poetry that is both reflective and nostalgic, signifying strong family ties, and an admiration for the hard work of their forefathers.

Seamus Heaney’s When all the Others and Robert Hayden’s Those Winter Sundays I found the work on these poems quite interesting, as the topic they covered, child/parent relationships is something we can all relate to as it is something we all have, or wish we have.

Digging By Seamus Heaney About this Poet Seamus Heaney is widely recognized as one of the major poets of the 20th century. A native of Northern Ireland, Heaney was raised in County Derry, and later lived for many years in Dublin. He was the author of over 20 volumes of poetry and.

Parental Love in “Digging” by Seamus Heaney and “Those Winter Sundays” by Robert Hayden PAGES 3. WORDS View Full Essay.

More essays like this: those winter sundays, theme. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University. Exactly what I needed. "Those Winter Sundays" Robert Hayden's, "Those Winter Sundays", is a poem of a son's regret over his inability to honor and appreciate his father during the course of his upbringing.

It uses one event to describe a father and son's entire relationship. Get an answer for 'In the poem "Those Winter Sundays," by Robert Hayden, what are the son's feeling towards his father?' and find homework help for other Those Winter Sundays questions at eNotes.

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Parental love in digging by seamus heaney and those winter sundays by robert hayden
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